Saturday, April 28, 2012

A Letter to Graduate Students...

My alma mater asked alumnus to write a brief piece to graduate students about life as a school counselor. I thought I would share my letter with all of you-enjoy!


Dear Future School Counselors-

I absolutely love working as a school counselor and you will too! Since graduating from Kean in December 2009 I have worked as a school counselor at both the elementary and middle school level. Currently, I am a school counselor at a K-7 school in --- New Jersey. Additionally, I have attained my LAC, and I am presently receiving supervision to earn my LPC.

I have created my own comprehensive school counseling program based off the American School Counseling standards. I work with students individually, in a group, and classroom setting. Furthermore, I have created proactive programs to improve the culture and climate of the school community. Everyday presents itself with different challenges, but also many rewards. I feel blessed to be able to work and learn from different students, staff, and families.

As a graduate student it is important to take advantage of every learning opportunity – go to every conference, ask questions, and don’t be afraid to try new things. Keep current on counseling trends by becoming active in the New Jersey School Counselors Association, and the American School Counseling Association.  Use social media to start your own professional learning network with school counselors and educators from across the United States. Please connect with me on my blog “The School Counselor’s Chronicle” www.counselinginschools.blogspot.com, “like” The School Counselor’s Chronicle on Facebook, or tweet me @NJSchCounselor for further ideas, information, and inspiration.

Congratulations graduate students you have a rewarding, challenging, and exciting career ahead of you!


What would you tell graduate students about their future school counseling careers?

1 comment:

  1. I would tell them to get as much experience in schools ahead of time as possible -- by subbing, volunteering, or taking a paraprofessional job. Ask around and see if you can observe some master teachers so you'll have a better handle on teaching in the classroom. I have found that graduate programs and even some internship placements do not provide enough background about and/or experience in teaching.

    Rebecca

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